Is your family prepared for disaster?

the fact is, far too many of us are unprepared when disaster strikes.  This general checklist will help you and your family in the absence of a written plan.

BEFORE THE DISASTER

DURING THE DISASTER

AFTER THE DISASTER

Before the Disaster

Step 1: Put together a plan by discussing these 4 questions with your family, friends, or household to start your emergency plan.  Emergency Plan

Step 2: Consider the needs of your household. As you prepare your plan tailor your plans and supplies to your specific daily living needs and responsibilities.

  • Different ages of members within your household

  • Responsibilities for assisting others

  • Locations frequented

  • Dietary needs

  • Medical needs including prescriptions and equipment

  • Disabilities or access and functional needs including devices and equipment

  • Languages spoken

  • Cultural and religious considerations

  • Pets or service animals

  • Households with school-aged children

Step 3:  Fill out & make copies of your Family Emergency Plan.

Link to PDF document here

Step 4:  Practice your plan with your family/household.

Step 5: Gather/Build Your Emergency Kit.

FIRE

  • Practice a household fire drill once every 6 months and identify your family assembly point

​​

SEVERE THUNDERSTORM:

  • Secure lawn furniture, toys, and lawn ornaments/seasonal decorations to prevent airborne missile hazards…prepare for a possible POWER OUTAGE

​​

TORNADO:

  • Instant opt-in for free severe weather & emergency alerts (text the word CLINTONCOUNTYALERTS to 226787)

  • Know where to go in your house for shelter (basement or room with no windows/exterior walls)

POWER OUTAGE:

  • Check your supplies and ensure you have extra batteries and non-electric methods to cook your food…freeze bottles of water to keep a convenience cooler for drinks

​​

PANDEMIC:

  • Store two week supply of water & food, keep prescriptions filled, talk to household about social distancing​​

Pets & Kids

The most overlooked demographic during a disaster:

  • After a disaster, kids often seek comfort from a pet…the loss of a pet

  • Do not enter damaged buildings until you are told that they are safe by a first responder

  • Check on your neighbors

  • Save your phone calls for emergencies…use text messaging if phone systems are busy

During the Disaster

FIRE

  • Sound the alarm, help others when possible, and evacuate to your Fire Evac/Neighborhood meeting location, then call 911

SEVERE THUNDERSTORM:

  • Stay weather aware (monitor weather and pay attention to storms resulting in weather warnings in advance of your location)

  • Head indoors, monitor the weather for additional watches/warnings, keep away from windows

  • If you have kids, keep a game or two with your emergency kit (or other items to help keep them occupied)

  • ​Ensure you have food & water, extra leash, and a dog toy as part of your emergency kit for your pet(s)

TORNADO:

  • Instant opt-in for free severe weather & emergency alerts (text the word CLINTONCOUNTYALERTS to 226787)

  • Sound the alarm, grab your emergency kit, head to your tornado shelter location, and monitor the weather

PANDEMIC:

  • ​Avoid close contact, cover your coughs, wash your hands, avoid touching your eyes, nose, mouth

After the Disaster

WARNING: Depending on the type of disaster, the risk of hazards may be exceptionally high (e.g. downed power lines, electrical hazards, gas leaks, sharp objects, damaged structures, et cetera).  

Power Outage

As applicable to the disaster:

  • If you are trapped from a structure collapse, cover your mouth with a cloth or mask to avoid breathing dust

  • Check the weather to ensure that the next round of storms isn’t about to surprise you or catch you out of your shelter

  • Check household members for injuries (treat based on your training & experience)

  • Wear thick soled shoes/boots before conducting a damage assessment

  • Check for damage (could be electrical or gas hazards)…stay clear of fallen power / broken utility lines

  • Do not enter damaged buildings until you are told that they are safe by a first responder

  • Check on your neighbors

  • Save your phone calls for emergencies…use text messaging if phone systems are busy